Jason’s Articles of the Month (March 2021)

Another monthly addition of my articles of the month! These articles cover sports-related concussion, repetitive head impacts, ACL injury risk, and the relationship between cognition and neuromotor performance.

Summary: Large prospective study of nearly 5,000 athletes that determined musculoskeletal injury rate was 87% greater in athletes who reported a prior sports-related concussion (SRC) within the previous 12 months. Interesting, this relationship was only present in non-contact, acute musculoskeletal injuries after SRC.

Summary: Individuals with a history of ACLR and matched controls completed neurocognitive testing, a lower extremity proprioception assessment, measures of dynamic lower extremity control, and neuroimaging. Increased visual cognition was associated with better proprioception and decreased time to stability during the jump-landing. Visual cognition was also associated with increased activation in brain regions related to sensory processing and motor control.

Summary: Knee biomechanics have been heavily studied as it relates to noncontact knee injuries in athletes. In this review, knee kinematics and kinetics were not associated with injury. This may be due to biomechanical assessments often ignoring any sort of cognitive constraint (e.g, temporal, space, obstacles) that is commonly seen in a sporting environment.

Summary: This was the first investigation to examine the relationship between repetitive head impacts and cervical spinal cord white matter integrity. White matter tracts associated with balance and postural control were most negatively affected following one season of football. Subsequent studies following concussive events may provide greater insight into the neural underpinnings of greater risk for lower extremity injury post-SRC.

Summary: A seminal paper defining various constructs of sports injury occurrence, data analysis, and injury risk factors and prevention. Recommended reading for anyone involved in sports injury research and clinical practice.

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